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Week of March 21-Hebrew

Morah Miriam-Hebrew

Shalom Dalet Families,

Today, we reviewed and sang the Ma Nishtanah! It was wonderful hearing the students singing the four questions in unison. Then, the students completed an interactive program where they were able to control my screen and put the Hebrew words of the Ma Nishtanah in the correct order. This activity showed the student’s progress in Hebrew as they were able to scan the Hebrew words on the screen and choose the correct words.

Happy Pesach! Chag Samech!

Week of March 21-Judaic Studies

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families,

The Dalet class this past Sunday had so much fun talking about the songs we sing at our Passover Seder.  We had so much fun first doing a quick recap of the 15 parts of the Seder.  The students shared their favorite parts of the Seder.  While so many parts of the Seder were mentioned most favorite parts had to do with food.   Whether making and eating maror with matza, matza with charoset or eating the yummy Pesach Seder dinner, the Dalet students like to eat.   Another top favorite choice was singing during the Passover Seder!   Students shared who, in their house, would be singing Ma Nishtana at their Seder.  Some shared they would be passing the torch onto younger siblings and some said it was their job and how much they are looking forward to it.  We sang the four questions and had a great time.  I then asked why they thought it would be so important to spend time at the Seder asking questions.  The students never fail to amaze me! They decided we ask questions so we can then ask more questions.  Aren’t they amazing!!!!  We couldn’t end without singing Dayenu.  We talked about the meaning of Dayenu, so please ask your child about this.  We watched the Maccabeats Dayenu video and had so much fun singing along.  

We do not have Hebrew School classes for the next two weeks. I will see your amazing children again on April 11th.  Until then Chag Pesach Sameach!

Week of March 14-Judaic  Studies

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families,

This week the dalet continued our Pesach learning journey.  Our class talked about the meaning of the word Seder and all of the steps of our seder using our Haggadah as our guide as well as the parts of the seder you are obligated to do.  The students shared their favorite parts of the seder. We did a bit of foreshadowing for our lesson this week when I asked the class to think about how ethic of Koach Hadibbur (power of speech) and the examples we can find in the story of Passover.  I can’t wait to hear the connections they make.  We will use these connections to continue having fun getting ready for the first night.  Since it was the most important question of the entire class, I had to leave time for the most hard hitting question of the day: what is your favorite Passover foods?  Eyes lit up and stomachs surely started growling since each student had quite a few to share like: matza brei, matza pizza, charoset and more.  I can’t wait!  

As always, if you have any questions please reach out to me at idillhyon@templeisraelnc.org

Week of March 14-Hebrew

Morah Miriam-Hebrew

Shalom Dalet Families,

Today, we applied our Hebrew reading skills to our learning about Pesach. First, we learned how to recite the Ten Plagues in Hebrew and Rabbi Judah’s reference to the plagues by their initials-“D’TZAKH ADASH B’AHAV”. We discussed several midrashim for the abbreviation including that the words were inscribed on Moshe’s staff to help him remember the plagues when he confronted Pharaoh. As a side, we learned the midrash that when Pharaoh tested Baby Moses by presenting him with a plate of shiny gold or hot coals, Moshe picked the hot coals and put them in his mouth which left him with a speech impediment. We also discussed the custom on spilling drops of wine as we recite the ten plagues to show that our joy at Pesach is not complete because it came at the expense of others and that we are symbolically recognizing the diminishing of the Egyptian’s power. We then learned how to say the items on the Seder Plate in Hebrew. The students interacted by answering multiple choice questions about the Seder plate with their Hebrew names.

B’Shalom

Week of March 7-Judaic Studies

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet Families,

We had so much fun in class this week!  This week the dalet class took a closer look at the very important Jewish ethic of shalom bayit.  Specifically, how shalom bayit means to appreciate every member of your family by working together to make sure of happiness and peace in the home.  To give us a chance to really dive in we used both a quiz and videos to deepen our conversations.  To start this we took a shalom bayit personality quiz.  Please ask your child about the quiz and the answers they chose.   One of the first questions of this fun personality quiz was:

It’s pizza night for dinner.  Your sister plays basketball and is really hungry when she comes home.  There are two slices of pizza left in the pizza box.  You have already had 2 slices of pizza but are still hungry.  Do you: a) grab an apple and leave both pieces of pizza for your sister; b) eat one slice of the two left – your sister will never know and she will still have one slice; or c) eat both slices of pizza – you snooze you lose! 

The dalet students really liked the quiz.  This led us to a discussion of sometimes it may be fun to think about choosing choice c but when we think about how we can show appreciation for our siblings and create shalom bayit we would choose choice a.  I think we can all relate since we have all had that moment of “I should have said…” when thinking of a situation we were in but we may have decided to instead say what would promote shalom bayit in our house.

We then watched a fun, short video called “I’ll be there for you” which talked about the sibling relationship between Moses, Miriam and Aaron.  We looked at the times Miriam watched over her brother, Aaron helped Moses and all three worked together.  It also showed when Miriam gossips about her brother Moses and is punished with a skin affliction.  Moses prays for his sister’s healing.  When we were done with the short video I asked the class why they thought Moses would pray for Miriam’s healing even though she spoke bad of him?  Your children never cease to amaze me with their kind hearts and deep insights as to why.  Please ask them about this.

Finally, we watched a small portion of the original Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.  While most of the class has seen the movie or read the book I have all a quick recap so all knew what we would watch and why.  We watched the small clip of Veruca Salt whose father buys her anything she wants.  She was in the chocolate factory in the room with the geese that lay the golden eggs and let everyone around her know what she wanted and what would happen if she didn’t get it.   Once it was over I asked the class if giving someone everything they want is the way to shalom bayit, peace in the home?  Why or why not?  The answers ranged from ‘I would give in so not to have to deal with tantrums’ to ‘not to give in because it would never stop’.  I then asked to imagine they were Veruca Salt’s sibling and if they thought there was shalom bayit in the home – all agreed and shared that they felt there was no way there could be peace in the home in the funniest ways possible.  Please ask your child what they thought.   I then asked if any of them were surprised that Veruca Salt was deemed a bad egg and sent down the garbage shoot.  All agreed that it did not surprise them at all…. It did not surprise me either! 

I know the Kitah Dalet class is full of good eggs who are working hard to create shalom bayit and I am looking forward to seeing them again next week! 

Week of March 7

Morah Miriam-Hebrew

Shalom Dalet Families,

I will teaching Liat’s Dalet Hebrew class while she is on maternity leave. I’m excited to work with the students! Today, we reviewed the Hebrew letters and vowels and focused on the EH vowel sounds. We read lines of Hebrew emphasizing the EH sounds as a class, and I also called on individual students to read words aloud. The students also answered riddles by writing words in Hebrew. For example, a clue was-the Rabbi stands on this when he leads services-and the students wrote the בִּימָה. It was wonderful reconnecting with the students, and I look forward to the next few weeks.

B’Shalom,

Morah Margaret/Miriam

Week of February 28-Hebrew

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

On Sunday, we learned the EH vowel. Students first completed a reading activity with words consisting of only the EH vowel and then they completed a reading activity with words consisting of EH and other vowels learned.

Beginning next week, I will be out on maternity leave. It has been a pleasure teaching these wonderful students and I am really going to miss them. Hopefully, I will be able to return in April. In my absence, Morah Margaret Musa will be teaching your students.

L’Shalom!

Week of February 28

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families,

This week the Dalet class dove a little deeper into hakarat hatov (gratefulness) and focused our discussion on finding the positive.   

As a class we looked at a group of pictures which showed different sticky situations.   Each one was a snapshot in time of siblings or friends who were interacting.  I asked the class to see if they could each find 4-5 negative things from the photos.  The answers came really quick.  The Dalet class could see issues with each photo and this portion was complete in no time.   I then asked them to take a look at the photos again and look for 4-5 positive things happening within the photo.  We found that while everyone found positives in the photos it took a much longer time to do so.  They shared they really had to look not only at the faces of their people in the photos but what was happening all around which helped them find a positive piece in each photo we may have overlooked at first glance.  We then talked about how much harder it can be to find the positive sometimes but how much more fun it was to look at the pictures when they were looking to find the positives.  We used this exercise to jump into a discussion on how it takes work to find the positive but when we do it helps us see how much we are truly grateful for.   

Last week I introduced the 100 brachot challenge which asks the students to think about 100 things they are thankful for (a blessing in their lives).   This was not a homework assignment and they did not have to share the things they thought about or wrote down – just a challenge which I gave to each student.   All of the students shared they had taken time to think about the things they are grateful for but no one had gotten to 100 items.  I extended this challenge asking them to not only think about the things they are grateful for but to take this week to stop and find the positives in different parts of their day when things seem the hardest.  When we take time to find the positives we tend to find more that we are thankful for.  I cannot wait to hear their thoughts on this challenge on Sunday.

This lesson was so much fun to do with your children – I am truly grateful for each one of them.

Week of February 21-Judaic Studies

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families!

Chag Purim Sameach!  With this joyous holiday upon us it was a wonderful chance to dive a bit deeper into hakarat hatov (gratitude).  The Dalet class watched a fun video retelling the story of Purim and then each shared their favorite part(s).  We went over the key moments in the Megillah story that led to the Jewish people being saved and where in the gratitude was shown.    Please ask your child about the phrase ‘mishenichas Adar marbim b’simcha’!  The Dalet class learned this means ‘when the month of Adar arrives we should increase our joy’.  We took time to share why we think we this is a true statement and the students (six steps ahead of me as always) agreed Adar is a special time for happiness because we are grateful for and celebrate the reversal of fortune the Jewish people. 

Before the end of our class I asked for all of the students to think something they are grateful for everyday. Then I asked if more than one thing came to their mind when I asked the question since all of them had big smiles on their faces.   All of the Dalet students agreed they had quite a few things come to mind all at once when they were asked the above question.    I saw it as a great time to introduce the 100 Brachot Challenge.   I asked the students to take this week and challenged them to write down 100 things they are grateful for.   I explained to the students that they do not have to share their lists or turn them in. This challenge is for them to take a moment and recognize all the good in their lives and to write these down.  If they smiled big thinking of just a few things they are thankful for I can only imagine how they will feel looking at a long list!   Can’t wait to see your children again this Sunday!

Week of February 21-Hebrew

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

This week, we reviewed vowels learned so far. Students were given words in English and they had to identify the letters with their correct vowels and write them in Hebrew. For example: students were given the word “B’gadeem” and they worked together to write in Hebrew בְּגָדִים.

Happy Purim!

Week of February 7-Judaic Studies

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families!!

This past Sunday we dove deeper into the Jewish value of responsibility….Achrayut in our Judaic Studies Superbowl edition class!  With the Superbowl happening later Sunday evening I thought it would be a great chance for us to take a second look at how Achrayut applies even in the group sports /activities whether they be ones we watch or ones we play.  

Teammates spend a lot of time together just as both teams in the Superbowl spend a lot of time together.  So, they have a lot of time to get to know each other very well like family or close neighbors.    My question to the class: knowing how much time teammates spend together, how can teammates (whether sports, activities or class teams) show v’ahavta l’reacha kamocha (loving your neighbor as yourself)?  The class had a lot answers:  support each other, encourage each other and so many more great ways to show chesed (kindness). 

We have all made mistakes when on a team or in a class, right?  We may think, “I just made a mistake, everyone is looking at me!  What do I do?”  All of the students know that feeling since we aren’t perfect.   Now imagine that mistake happening on the field during the Superbowl with cameras rolling!!!  We all agreed whether a referee or a player that would have to overwhelming.  So, how can our teammates or coach show us v’ahavta l’reacha kamocha?  The class responded with answers that they would like someone to say to them (how awesome to be able to put themselves in another person’s shoes!).  Please ask your child to share with you responses they gave to this question – you won’t be sorry!

At the end of the class we all agreed that we couldn’t believe we found a Jewish value in the Superbowl!

We do not have class next week so I look forward to seeing the Dalet class again on February 21st.

As always, please reach out to me with any questions.

Week of February 7-Hebrew

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

On Sunday, we reviewed the Sh’va vowel xְ and its exceptions (short/ EH sound). Students practiced reading and complete an activity identifying the different Sh’va sounds. Then, we learned the EE vowel and practiced reading.

L’Shalom.

Week of January 31-Hebrew

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

This week, we talk about the exceptions to the Sh’va vowel xְ (short sound); when the xְ is an EH sound. Rule 1: xְ at the first letter of a word (ex: בְּךָ – Behcha). Rule 2: two consecutive Sh’va in the middle of a word (xְ xְ ); the first xְ will be a short sound and the second xְ will be an EH sound (ex: נַפְשְׁךָ – Nafshecha).  We practiced reading and students showed an understanding of these concepts.

L’Shalom!

Week of January 31-Judaic Studies

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet Families!

We had the furriest, sweetest class this week!  We learned about the Jewish ethic of kindness to animals.  It was so fun to listen to all of the students tell us about their animals and then see so many of them make personal appearances.    The class discussed what it means to take care of animals, both house pets and wild animals. 

I introduced the very important Jewish ethic of Tza’ar Ba’alei Chayim which commands us to show ethical treatment to animals and to ensure no animal is hurting even if it just means that we ensure our own animals are not hungry.   We found that we must take care of our animals before we take care of ourselves and all agreed that it can be hard sometimes.  I introduced the animals I have in my house as well (which many times feels like a farm).  With three cats and two dogs we are busy enough but I introduced the class, by zoom, to our two pet ducks – Sir Jeffers and Grape.   We were able to find common ground on responsibilities with our animals whether taking them for a walk, feeding them dinner or making sure they are getting some needed attention.  Sometimes that can be hard if it is raining outside, really cold or if we are busy when our responsibilities needed to be done.   The class found it funny that the ducks require the same care as their animals and whether rain, hot or cold, need to be taken care of and given love and attention too.   I shared that by doing these “everyday tasks” they are performing the amazing, important act of Tza’ar Ba’alei Chayim and they didn’t even know it.  How amazing are your kids!

Last year, while exploring the Book of Genesis, we learned about the servant Isaac who goes to find a wife for Isaac.  Rebecca was chosen to be Isaac’s wife because of the kindness she showed to animals since she not only gave him water, but also eagerly provided water for his ten thirsty camels. Rebecca’s concern for camels was evidence of a tender heart and compassion for all God’s creatures.  We found this pretty cool that we were able to make a connection on what we had learned about last year!

Before we ended class we watched a 1 minute story called, “How to Heal a Broken Wing” This book tells the story of a bird with a broken wing who is stranded and very vulnerable in the middle of a busy street. Lots of people (mostly adults!) walk by continuing their important lives but one little boy, Will, stops. With the help of his parents, he takes care of the bird and nurses her back to health. At the end of the book she is healed and flies off, free as wild animals should be.  It was the sweetest book.

I look forward to seeing the Dalet class again this Sunday!

Week of January 24

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families!

I hope you have all had a great week.  This past Sunday was all about the happy , very tasty and very tree loving holiday of Tu B’Shvat.  The class shared all they know about Tu B’Shvat and it was amazing!  Wow!  We watched a great video called ‘Tu B'shvat Tale: Honi Comes Full Circle for the Jewish Birthday of the Trees’ which is such a great video!  The video turned our discussion as time to talk about what planting for the future means.  The class came to the conclusion from our conversation and the video that we plant for the future even knowing we may not see the plant grow fruit but later generations will.   We even heard some stories from the class of their experiences planting new trees and trees they have watched grow.  We all agree that for all the food, air, wood, and shelter that trees give us – they definitely deserve a birthday. 

Please ask your children about what they learned about a Tu B’Shvat seder!   We talked about three different plates of different types of fruit we may find on a Tu B’Shvat Seder table:  1. fruit with a hard outside but soft inside, 2. fruits with a soft outside but a pit or hard inside and 3. fruits that are completely edible.

Such a wonderful group our Dalet class is!  I can’t wait to see your children again next week!! 

Morah Ilene

Week of January 24

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

On Sunday, we reviewed AH vowel and beginning sound. We practiced reading and played a game were students had words in English and they had to write them in Hebrew. For example, students were given the word “Shabbat” and needed to write שָׁבָּת. We then learned the Sh’va vowel xְ (short sound). Student practiced reading words with this vowel.

L’Shalom,

Morah Liat

Week of January 10

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families,

Happy New Year!  What a wonderful treat to see your children’s faces again after the long break.  With the New Year just behind us, I could think of no better topic to talk about than Teshuvah ( to return).  I started the class by asking if anyone had ever heard the phrase “new year, new you”?  They shared they felt it meant that we can work to change something about ourselves or our lives and taking a look at your goals for the New Year.  The Dalet class smartly decided that the goals could be the same ones as the year before depending on if they met the ones they set last year or they may be new goals we want to set for ourselves (seriously I have to work hard to keep up with your children’s great thoughts!)  The one thing we all agreed on is our goals we set for ourselves are ours to choose.   Now, I don’t know about you but I am a master at making mistakes and I shared this with the class.  We are human and all make mistakes – this is where we can really use the idea of Teshuvah – to return- so we can work to repair things we have done wrong or to find a new way so we can get back on the right path.  Mistakes mean we are trying!!!   As an example, I asked if they had ever watched mom, dad, grandma or grandpa use a car navigation or a phone’s GPS to take your family where they are trying to go when on a trip.  Sometimes even with perfect directions – we miss our turn and our navigation system or phone tells or shows a word on the screen.  I asked if anyone knew what it was and the word – recalculating -was mentioned quite a few times.  The GPS helps us recalculate and right our mistakes by sometimes taking us back where we started and by sometimes finding us a brand new way.  We can do the same thing.  Sometimes to right a mistake we can start over and sometimes we just have to find a new path.  The important thing about our example is however the GPS recalculates it still takes us to our destination, Teshuvah,  does the same thing for us! 

 I introduced a new word to the class ‘Chet’ which literally means – missing the mark.  I shared that sometimes we follow the right path to reach our goal but it doesn’t take us to exactly the right place or we don’t get the result we hope.  How do we fix this?  Your children shared that we have to change what we are doing or see where we can fix it – AMAZING answer.  To get up and move a little bit I asked each student to grab a stuffed animal, a balled up piece of paper, a soft ball or something they could throw at a target of their choosing in their house.  Once all were back I asked them to choose a target to try and hit 10 times by throwing their chosen item at the target and then come back to the screen.  Once all were back I asked if they hit the mark every time (I definitely didn’t lol).  We all found we missed our mark at least once.  So the question I asked is how they fixed it.  Each student shared that they fixed it by changing how hard they threw or where they threw from – Aha! we all had a chance to see Chet (missing our mark) in action and then we worked on Teshuvah.  We changed something we did to meet our goal.  So much fun moving around and getting a hands on Jewish lesson!!    Having this time with your children made my day!   I hope you all have a wonderful week and I can’t wait to see the Dalet class again on January 24th.  I hope you all enjoy participating in the zoom activities for Temple Israel’s Annual Yom Gemilut Hashadim - Mitzvah Day, on January 17.

Week of January 10

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

I hope everyone enjoyed their winter break. On Sunday, we started our reading sessions and building our reading skills. After reviewing vowels, we went over our reading strategies: 1. recognize the letter; 2. recognize the vowel; 3. put them together. We then practiced reading words with AH vowel and beginning sounds.

Week of December 13

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

This week lesson was dedicated to CHANUKAH!  Students shared their family traditions and their favorite parts of Chanukah.  We watched a short clip on the story of Hanukkah and then we played a Hanukkah Hangman game based on the information from the video. After that, we talked about the letters on the dreidel and their meanings.  We looked at the difference between dreidels in Israel and outside of Israel. In Israel, there’s the letter פ for “here” / "פה" (a great miracle happened here) and outside of Israel, there’s the letter ש for “there” / "שם" (a great miracle happened there). We ended class with a game about the differences between a Menorah and a Chanukiah. Ask your child for the three main differences.

Happy Chanukah and a wonderful winter break.

Week of December 13

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families!

This week we continued our discussion about gevurah – strength.  However, we could not start class without a little talk about Chanukah!  Your children shared traditions your family does each Chanukah that they look forward to every year.  So much fun to see them be so excited!   We then moved on to  look back at last week’s lesson and what Chanukah teaches us and reminds us of each year:  The story of the Maccabees reminds us of triumph in the face of overwhelming odds and inspires us as we retell the story of the festival of lights!   Thinking of what we learned we discussed how it makes us feel once we have said the blessing and lit the candles on the menorah when we stand back to get a good look.  Your children said it makes them feel proud, excited for presents (of course J), and happy to be with family.  Such kind answers from some amazing kids.  They shared they feel proud when they look at the candles burning since they feel connected to their Jewish community when they think about every Jewish household all over the world lighting the same number of candles each night.  What a wonderful thing to think about when lighting candles each night.  Your students never fail to amaze me with their insightfulness.   Of course all of the students’ favorite night is the 8th night when the menorah is the brightest.  For some fun I shared my screen so we all could watch the Maccabeats video: Pan Fry.  It is so much fun to watch since they do Chanukah mashups to songs like old town road.  If you haven’t seen it yet it is too good not to enjoy.  

I was sad to say goodbye to the students for now but we all laughed when we said “see you next year.”  So, I will say it here as well – have a wonderful and safe remaining part of Chanukah, and a very happy New Year filled with good health and happiness.  See you all next year!

Week of December 6

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

We began class with a vowel recognition game. We then started to review vowels. We looked at each vowel group and learned strategies on how to identify each group.

Ah vowel: the only vowel that has lines in its signs

EE vowel: one small dot for one small sound

EH vowel: most number of dots (2, 3, and 5)

OH vowel: the dot is On (sound OH) top of a letter

We also looked at the differences between EH and EI sounds.

 

Happy Chanukah!

Week of December 6

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

This week our Dalet class focused on the Jewish value of Gevurah (strength).  There is no better time to discuss strength since Chanukah is only a few days away.  Your children shared their favorite parts of Chanukah and the foods they love the most.   I then shared one of my favorite Chanukah stories ‘Hanukkah at Valley Forge’ which shares a story, based on fact, about General Washington meeting a Polish soldier at the Valley Forge camp on the first night of Hanukkah.  The soldier shares the story of the Maccabees and the miracle of the oil which lasted 8 nights.  Your children really enjoyed this so please ask them about their thoughts on this retelling.    Once the story was over, my question to the class “what kind of gevurah do you see in the story of Chanukkah?” was met with fantastic answers:

Persistence as a strength since the Maccabees  didn’t give up.  They kept going until they won.

The Maccabees’ beliefs and patience as strengths since they would not worship as the Greeks wanted them to and even though it took time did not waiver from their practices.  Once the battle was over they then took time to clean the temple and put it back as it should be.  Strength of their belief in God that when they only found enough oil to light for one night they lit it anyway with the knowledge they would have to have patience to make new oil even though they wanted it right away.

Confidence as a strength since they trusted in themselves and Judah Maccabee.

Resilience as a strength since they didn’t win every time but each time they recovered and kept going.

The best part of this was to look at their faces while in our zoom class and remind them that each of these strengths they shared with me are ones they hold as well.  They are each like a Maccabee living in 2020 showing strengths of patience, confidence in themselves in the classroom as they share their ideas, resilience in all 2020 has been and persistence since they have not given up. Your children are amazing – but I know you already knew this J

Have a wonderful and warm Chanukah as the lights brighten your home.  Please reach out to me with any questions and I look forward to seeing your children next week!

BLOG Dalet (4th) Week of November 22

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

We started class with a letter recognition game. Students are showing great improvement in recognizing letters. Well done! We then started to review vowels. We completed two assessments and played a vowel recognition game.  Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

BLOG Dalet (4th) Week of November 22

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families,

My favorite day of the week seeing my favorite students has come and gone and it was just as fun as I hoped it would be!  This week our class learned about the value of Achrayut (responsibility).  Our focus being what responsibility do we have to others in our behavior?  To start the class off we talked about all the time we have been able to spend with family and in previous classes they spoke about how thankful they were for that time.  We started our discussion talking of the wonderful time we spend with our parents and siblings and how it is normal to get frustrated sometimes.  At the time it may feel good to say what we want to get off our chest but sometimes we may not do this in the kindest way.  So, my question to them was - Do we have a responsibility when these times happen for the way we treat one another in times we are frustrated and possibly angry.  Your kids answered they felt we do have a responsibility to think before we act since we can’t take those words back.  Now they did feel that sometimes they may react to someone else’s frustrations as well and they don’t think about what is said until afterward.  They shared while they do feel better initially once saying maybe not the nicest answers they do think about it and it is the best when all come back together to say sorry and take responsibility for their actions so it does not happen again.   

For fun and because his actions fit in to our do not column so often, we watched a clip of Simon Cowell from America’s Got Talent. The video was a compilation of times when he was really, really rude to contestants when they came onto the show.  I watched the students as they viewed the video – at times their eyes widened when they heard the things Simon was saying and how the contestants reacted to the insults, other times they just shook their heads.  When I asked them if Simon had a responsibility to the contestants for the way he acted they all agreed he absolutely did.  Even if he did not think they were very good – Simon still should have found better ways to share his critiques, maybe the other judges should have stopped them or the producers should not have allowed these parts to be shown.   However, once it was brought up by one student all did say that maybe the contestants did or should have known how they may be treated since they most likely would have seen Simon Cowell before, but would have done it anyway because of the possibility of winning money.  Wow – the value of Achrayut and a reality TV show really conflict!! Haha!  

We then moved on to sharing a story in a comic strip form – so fun!  This is one many knew already but were excited to see again – the Hillel story. The Hillel comic tells of a man who visits a Rabbi and says – Please teach me the entire Torah.  I will stand on one leg the entire time to show how much I want to learn.  In this story, the Rabbi sends him away and not with the kindest words.   The man then goes to see Rabbi Hillel.  Rabbi Hillel welcomes the man in and listens to the man repeat the words and request said above.  Rabbi Hillel’s answer: Listen closely.  What is harmful to you do not do to your fellow human beings.  That is the whole Torah.  The rest is commentary.  What a great lesson about the Torah!   The students already knew and shared that many teachings from Rabbis were written down in a book called the Mishnah.  This class is so smart, so insightful and ready to learn and share.  They are a treat to teach on Sundays.   

We will not have class on the 29th.  I hope you all have a very Happy Thanksgiving and I look forward seeing your children again on December 6th!

BLOG Dalet (4th) Week of November 15-Hebrew

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

We continued our lesson on final letters (ם,ף,ך,ן,ץ). Students learned how to identify the final letter based on its “regular” letter and vice versa.  Then, students practiced writing final letters. We continued with reviewing beginning sounds of letters. Next week, we will finish with beginning sounds and start reviewing vowels.

L’Shalom!

BLOG Dalet (4th) Week of November 15

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families,

As always, it was wonderful to see your children this past Sunday!  This week we talked about the value of Hakarat Hatov (gratitude and thankfulness).  This is such an interesting and important value which we are just scratching the surface of.  The students defined this as feeling thankful or good for the things we enjoy.  They are right but we weren’t stopping there!

We explored how saying ‘thank you’ or showing gratitude means so much to those around us and to us as well.  The students talked about how showing gratitude makes them feel as well.  They agreed that watching someone smile when we show gratitude or say thanks makes us feel good whether we show gratitude for someone in our community or in our home.  We also discussed how good we feel when someone recognizes what you have done or the hard work you have put forth.  This shows us how much we can change the world by recognizing those around us because it this busy life it can be easy to forget.

I thought it would be a good idea to talk about those times where we aren’t thanked for doing something nice.  We all knows how it feels to open the door for someone and then find ourselves the unofficial door holder for everyone else who is coming into a building whether we know them or not.   Some of the people who come in and say thank you which is so nice but just as many may not even acknowledge you are there or just look at you and keep walking.  The students shared how this made them feel.  They shared it can make them feel frustrated or feel like they don’t want to do it again.    Our discussion then turned to share that Hakarat Hatov, when we explore it further means when we do get frustrated when someone doesn’t say thank you or doesn’t acknowledge our hard work should not stop us from doing those acts of kindness – just as our family wouldn’t stop doing the things which mean so much to us but we may not show thankfulness for.     We shared that sometimes we may not know what is going on in someone else’s life and that may be the reason they aren’t saying thank you.  Some of the reasons the class gave were – maybe they are worried about family, have a lot of work to do, and even if they are thinking of a fun game and just forget the world around them (I know this happened to all of us lol)

When we feel frustrated or upset where we are not are not shown gratitude or given thanks for something we do – like the example above of holding a door open – it is important for us to ask ourselves a question, “why did I decide to do this act of kindness?  Did I see someone who I could tell needed help?” or if they are stuck as official door holder we may later ask ourselves “Why didn’t I just walk away – is it because I didn’t want the door to hit someone if I just walked away?”  Once we find our answers to these questions the most important one to ask ourselves is “when I did this act of kindness – did I only do it for a thank you?” or if we are working hard we need to ask ourselves “did I just work hard or practice hard for a ‘good job’ or did I do it for me so I feel good about me?”  Your children’s answers that they gave to the class from the above questions are what will keep us doing our best for our community, our families and ourselves.  Our future is in great hands with our Dalet students!

Please reach out to me if you have any questions or concerns.

BLOG Dalet (4th) Week of November 8

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families!

What a treat it is each Sunday to see your children and hear their thoughts on topics and insightful answers on what we are learning about!

This week we began our exploration of Koach Hadibbur (power of speech).   The class shared their thoughts on why this foundational value would be so important that we would dedicate our class time to learning and understanding the power of speech and how it is intertwined with Jewish practice and customs.    In a fun rewind we began our journey by going back to our lessons from last year when we explored the Book of Genesis to discuss how Koach Hadibbur is at play in the first stories in the Book of Genesis about the beginning of the world with God creating through speaking (“Let there be….and there was”.)

To relate how the Power of Speech has such a large part in our own lives we discussed how we can tell a lot about someone by the words they say and how those words can last and still be shared many years later.  To have some fun while doing this we watched a video about the baseball manager/ player Yogi Berra and his famous Yogi-isms.  None of the kids knew who he was so it was a great opportunity to put our above lesson into play. By watching this short video we were able to talk about what type of person we felt Yogi Berra was just from his quotes which have lasted the quite the test of time and shown what a funny guy he was. 

We ended our discussion looking at how we use our power of speech to perform Tikkun Olam – repairing the world.  Your children gave examples of how we can use the power of speech to lift up a friend’s spirits when they are down, how we can encourage others to do acts of kindness, and how we can say a kind word to a stranger which may change their whole day!   What kind hearts are in the Dalet class!

Please reach out to me with any questions.

Morah Ilene

BLOG Dalet (4th) Week of November 8

Morah Liat-Hebrew

Shalom Chaverim,

We began class with a few games in letter recognition, sister letters and sister sounds. These games were interactive; allowing students to write on the whiteboard and practice writing letters. Then, we started to review final letters (ם,ף,ך,ן,ץ).  We will continue with this topic next class. PLEASE make sure that your child will have something to write with during our classes (a dry erase white board or a notebook).

L’Shalom

BLOG-Dalet (4th) Hebrew

Morah Liat-Hebrew

11/1/2020

Shalom Chaverim,

On Sunday, we reviewed the material learned last class; Sister Letters and Sister Sounds. We practiced recognizing, sounding, and writing them. Then, we started to review Final Letters (ף,ך,ן,ם,ץ). We will continue with this topic next class. PLEASE make sure that your child will have something to write with during our classes (a dry erase white board or a notebook).

L’Shalom,

Morah Liat

 

10/25/2020

Shalom Chaverim,

We started class with the Alf-Bet song. Here is a link for the video if you feel like sing along with us: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0LSBeX5uYw . Then, we reviewed letters and talked about Sister Letters (בּ,ב/כּ,כ/פּ,פ/שׁ,שֹ) and Sister Sounds (א,ה,ע/ח,כ/כּ,ק/ס,שׁ/ט,ת).

L’Shalom,

Morah Liat

 

10/18/2020

Shalom Kitah Dalet and welcome to a unique and exciting year at TIRS.

It was great seeing everyone again. We started class with an introduction game. Then, students shared why it is important for them to learn Hebrew and their goals for this year’s Hebrew class. We ended class with an interactive game of letter recognition.

L’Shalom,

Morah Liat

BLOG-Dalet (4th)

Morah Ilene-Judaic Studies

Hi Dalet families! 

What a treat it is each Sunday to see your children and hear their thoughts on topics and insightful answers on what we are learning about! 

This week we began our exploration of Koach Hadibbur (power of speech).   The class shared their thoughts on why this foundational value would be so important that we would dedicate our class time to learning and understanding the power of speech and how it is intertwined with Jewish practice and customs.    In a fun rewind we began our journey by going back to our lessons from last year when we explored the Book of Genesis to discuss how Koach Hadibbur is at play in the first stories in the Book of Genesis about the beginning of the world with God creating through speaking (“Let there be….and there was”.)  

To relate how the Power of Speech has such a large part in our own lives we discussed how we can tell a lot about someone by the words they say and how those words can last and still be shared many years later.  To have some fun while doing this we watched a video about the baseball manager/ player Yogi Berra and his famous Yogi-isms.  None of the kids knew who he was so it was a great opportunity to put our above lesson into play. By watching this short video we were able to talk about what type of person we felt Yogi Berra was just from his quotes which have lasted the quite the test of time and shown what a funny guy he was.  

We ended our discussion looking at how we use our power of speech to perform Tikkun Olam – repairing the world.  Your children gave examples of how we can use the power of speech to lift up a friend’s spirits when they are down, how we can encourage others to do acts of kindness, and how we can say a kind word to a stranger which may change their whole day!   What kind hearts are in the Dalet class! 

Please reach out to me with any questions. 

Morah Ilene 

Tue, April 13 2021 1 Iyyar 5781